Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Kindergarten Diaries: Sept. 1

If you know my children, you know they share many similarities with Scott and I. They certainly have bits and pieces that are all their own, but it’s no secret that Claire got a healthy dose of Scott’s DNA and Grace has quite a bit of mine. 

If you know Scott, you know he’s pretty forgetful. One time, when we lived in Wichita, he was driving home and missed the exit … and then drove for another 20 minutes before he realized his mistake. I can’t count how many times he has lost his wallet or his keys. In fact, he once put his keys on top of my car, forgot they were there, and we didn’t find them until I saw them flying off the back. On. The. Highway. He can be, at times, spacey. 

So, Claire. Sweet, sweet, Claire. This chick is bright. There is no doubt about it. She’s been able to count to 100 since she was four. She can do simple addition and subtraction. She knows her letters, her sounds and is starting to read. She’s a smart kid. But she’s a total space cadet. 


Most days it takes me reminding her three and four times to get things done. It’s not that she gets distracted (although that happens sometimes, too). It’s that in the time it takes between when I tell her to do something and her walking to do it, she forgets. Yesterday, I asked her to go upstairs and get Henry a diaper. She said “Ok, Mom!” and ran up the stairs. About 10 seconds later, she was back down, saying “What was I getting again?” 

I put her name on her lunchbox and backpack, knowing that one day those will get left somewhere. I don’t worry too much about these things because for the most part, Grace wouldn’t let her leave anything behind. Grace is rarely absentminded about things like that. When Claire misplaces a book or stuffed animal, Grace is the first person I turn to — even before Claire. 

So, back to what happened today. Claire got off the bus and is filling me on the day’s happenings when she says, “Mom, I had to eat hot lunch because I forgot my lunchbox in my backpack. But I didn’t like the burrito, so I only ate my apple and milk.” 

I asked why she didn’t just tell someone that she forgot her lunchbox and it turns out this isn’t the first time this has happened and she was worried she would disappoint her teacher again. 

I know this spacey behavior is not intentional and it’s not a result of her not listening — these types of things just don’t stick in her brain like numbers and letters do. So, we talked through some techniques to help her remember to grab her lunchbox before heading to the cafeteria. She seems to feel better about the whole thing, so I’m hopeful that our ideas, plus just talking about it so much will help her remember tomorrow. 

But I do know her Dad, so I’m hopeful, but not holding my breath. Let’s cross our fingers that tomorrow’s hot lunch is better than today’s. 

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